Nihongo Art Contest Awards Presentation and Workshop

Sat Nov 28, 2009 - 2:30 pm - Sat Nov 28, 2009 - 4:30 pm @
NAC09 1.jpg

AWARD PRESENTATION



WORKSHOPS
TITLE: "TRANSLATIONS"

WORKSHOP I: "LOST/FOUND IN TRANSLATION"

A new take on an old game: Players will be asked to use their English
and Japanese skills, as this is an exercise in our verbal language skills and our natural ability to interpret meaning; As a message is passed along a line of students, each player is asked to translate the meaning of the message from English to Japanese, or from Japanese back to English. As in broken telephone, the idea of this game is to pass a message from one person to the other, observing how words and meanings change (or don't change) as the message is passed through a chain of many people speaking more than one language.






WORKSHOP II: "TRANSFER DRAWING"
(Oppenheim, 1971 - revisited): This activity is taken after a drawing exercise performed by Dennis Oppenheim and his son in 1971.

Students will begin by working in pairs, before moving on to work in small groups. As in the title, these drawings will be a group effort, using the idea of 'transfer' to achieve a drawing.

(There will be a brief demonstration before we begin this activity.)

Each pair will be given one marker and a surface to draw on. Standing one behind the other, the student sitting in the back will use their finger to very slowly draw a kanji character on the back of the person in front of him/her. Feeling the finger pressure on his/her back the student in front will attempt to follow the line as closely as possible, transferring the drawing from their back onto the drawing surface using the marker.

Students should change roles to experience both perspectives of this exercise. I would like to challenge older students to attempt drawing a poem or sentence to see what variety can be achieved.


ABOUT ANNIE ONYI CHEUNG

Annie Onyi Cheung’s work in time-based and three-dimensional media explores themes of memory, identity, shame and vulnerability, as well as generational and cultural difference. She is drawn to concepts that can be investigated through experiential environments, unravelling imagery and narratives, and bridging gaps between disparate perspectives. Her art manifests as combinations of performance, video and installation.

This emerging artist is a recent graduate of Art History and Studio Art from the University of Toronto.

www.onyi-ajar.com